Most action-packed jungles


Tiger scouting, Chitwan National Park, Nepal

If you want to see a tiger that isn’t shuffling about in a zoo or on the front of a cereal packet, head for Chitwan National Park in the Nepalese jungle, where there’s a 75 percent likelihood of a sighting. There are also night tours to further help you glimpse this nocturnal beast. But even if you don’t, it’s still the perfect place to channel your inner Mowgli, with heaps of other wildlife on view, such as leopards, sloths and water buffalo. Travel is via a mixture of elephant back, canoe, jeep and foot.

Tiger Safaris  are accompanied by a zoologist and local naturalist guides. Jeep tours and on-foot tracking tours are available, best taken late November to early May.


Gorilla tracking, Dzanga-Sangha Special Reserve, Central African Republic

When a trip promises ‘long and uncomfortable journeys’ by plane, jeep and canoe, there had better be a super-bright light at the end of the tunnel. In the case of the Dzanga-Sangha Special Reserve, there certainly is – it’s one of the few places where tourists can track the majestic but critically endangered western lowland gorillas. Fewer than 2000 westerners are thought to have visited this stunning jungle region, which is also home to forest elephants, buffalo, crocodiles and red river hogs, and the local Ba’Aka pygmy tribe, who help with the gorilla tracking.

It can take three to eight hours to track the gorillas, after which you’ll move with the group or sit as they groom.

Joy In the Rains


Monsoons In Maharashtra

A Rain Rendezvous In Kolad, Khandala, Harnai and Lavasa

lavasa

Discover Konkans scenic coastal beaches unique culture and cuisine that is specially lovely in the rains. Monsoon is when the locals love to visit the Sahyadris, when rain brings new life to the region and the water laden clouds hungs so low that you can walk in the clouds. With hundreds of waterfalls mushrooming all over the state, you are transported to a surreal, dreamy world of misty mornings, pleasant afternoons and chilly evenings.

Wake up to the sunrise on a mountain or sea fort and sunsets on a remote beach. Explore the myriad Konkan, its forests, forts and beaches. Go hiking, walking, rafting, segway riding, nature trailing, camping, driving or just watch the rain from your patio.

Experience the best of multiple landscapes in the same trip – Enjoy River, Ocean, Mountains and the Wilderness in the same trip with many ‘unique experiences’ for everybody in the family that makes for a forever memorable experience in Maharashtra Unlimited.

  1. Konkan – In the Middle of the River Kundalika in Kolad at Rivertrail Eco
  2. Konkan – On the Harnai Beach at Lotus Beach Resort
  3. Western Ghats – Overlooking the Valley at The Duke’s Retreat in Khandala and Ekaant Resort in Lavasa

For bookings write to us on adler-tours@hotmail.com or adlertourssafaris6@gmail.com 

 

The City of Lavasa


Nestled a midst the majestic Sahyadri mountains, along the contours of the sprawling Warasgaon Lake, is the planned hill city of Lavasa. Built on the principles of New Urban-ism, its a city where people can live work, learn and play in harmony with nature.

Where in Lavasa, make sure you

  • Start the day with a walk along the serene Nature Trails
  • Explore picturesque locules cruising along the city via the Trackless Train
  • Take a photograph from the numerious Viewing Galleries present
  • Jet Ski across the lake at Lake shore Water sports taking in the beauty of the valley
  • play a veriety of games like Electric Dart Machines, Photo Games & Bowling at the Neospark Games Arcade
  • Discover the city in an eco-friendly way through Robin – A self-balancing joyride ( available at Neospark )
  • Go camping at Xthrill Adventure Academy
  • Unwind at the spa at Dasvino Town & Country Club
  • Spend a peaceful evening strolling at the lakeside promenade

For inquiries / bookings :-

Weddings | MICE | Educational Tours | Summer Special Packages ( April 1st – June 30th ) | Mesmerizing Monsoon Packages ( July 1st – September 30th ) | Festive Fiesta Packages ( October 1st – December 31st )

Email us on adler-tours@hotmail.com or visit http://www.adler-tours.com 

West Coast, Sri Lanka ( What to do and What not to Miss !! )


For Packages write us on adler-tours@hotmail.com or visit us at http://www.adler-tours.com

Snapshot

Sri Lanka’s west coast covers the coastal belt just south of Colombo all the way down to Hikkaduwa. From that point on, Red Dot prefers to refer to the Galle coast, which is increasingly influenced by the famous old fortress town. The west coast is more frequented by holidaymakers due to its closer proximity to the island’s capital and the main airport, and offers tropical beaches and mangrove-lined lagoons The sandy beaches are the main attraction in the string of small towns such as Kalutara, Beruwela, Bentota, Ambalangoda, Ahungalla and Hikkaduwa, but they also share a vibrant cultural heritage including folklore, music and dance as well as architectural influences from the Dutch period. Many temples, kovils, churches and mosques are situated along the coast. Cottage industries such as basket-weaving, mask-carving and antique restoration provide for interesting shopping.

Don’t Miss:-
• Great sunbathing at excellent-value tropical hotels
• Water skiing in Bentota
• Dancing the night away in Hikkaduwa
• Surfing and deep sea fishing
• Stroll through Bevis Bawa’s Brief gardens
• Kosgoda’s marine turtles
• Traditional mask dancing in Ambalangoda
• Elephant Foot Drummers of Hikkaduwa
• Boat ride down mangrove-filled rivers
• Ancient temples & churches.

Getting There:-

Little more than an hour south of central Colombo, as you cross the Kalu Ganga Bridge, Sri Lanka’s West Coast really begins. From this point on all the way to Galle, the tiny main coastal road, known as the Galle Road, hugs the picturesque coast line and runs parallel to the rickety old railway which limps all the way to Matara. The trains stop at all the main town including Kalutara, Aluthgama, Hikkdaduwa and Galle, but the hill-country line is far more recommended. From Panadura, just before the west coast begins, you can most easily also head to Ratnapura, Sinharajah and the Southern Highlands.

Useful drive times include:

Colombo to Bentota (2 hours); Airport to Bentota (3 hours); Bentota to Hikkaduwa (45 minutes); Bentota to Galle (1.5 hours); Kandy to Kalutara (4 hours); Nuwara Eliya to Galle (6 hours); Uda Walawe to Galle (3.5 hours).

Historical Background

The west coast’s traditional beach hotels first began to spring up in the 1960s, and have become a significant factor in the island’s economy. But about 1,000 years earlier another influence first arrived on Sri Lanka’s shores – the ubiquitous coconut tree which has countless uses as well as adorning thousands of holiday pictures. Kalutara, named after the Kalu Ganga (Black River) that winds through this town, was an important spice trading centre during Colonial times. First the Portuguese in the 17th century followed by the Dutch were enticed by the cinnamon estates in the area and built a network of canals that were used to transport these spices. During the 19th century, the British converted these spice estates into Rubber plantations which remain to date. A canoe ride along the old Dutch Canals will take you past rural villages and old houses that are reminiscent of the colonial period.

Sights

Wadduwa & Kalutara, the first beach settlements along the west coast coming from Colombo, have a reputation for fine mangosteens – a luscious small purple colour fruit found in abundance along wayside stalls in July/August. Explore Kalutara’s colonial past with a visit to the Richmond Castle, an old spice-plantation mansion which can be reached by canoe down the old Dutch canals. Take a cycling trip inland through spice, fruit and rubber plantations. These are available for serious mountain bikers as well as families just wanting a leisurely afternoon ride. The beaches widen at Beruwela, which has a golden strip of mile-long beach, largely favoured by mid-range beach hotels of traditional style. For an unusual outing here, consider the Brief Gardens – a 25-acre estate which was the lifelong work of the celebrated landscape artist Bevis Bawa. A day excursion to the central rainforests of Sinharaja is also possible.

Bentota is blessed by the lazy waters of the Bentota River, ideal for watersports and boat trips. Bentota’s broad sandy beach with gently-shelving sands offer safe swimming making it one of the most appealing Sri Lankan destinations for a traditional and relaxing family holiday. Continue your journey further south to Ambalangoda where the mask carvers and puppet makers predominate. The turtle hatchery at Kosgoda plays a vital protective role for the turtles that lay their eggs on the beach annually, and is well worth a visit. The characterful town of Hikkaduwa attracts the backpackers, independent travellers, and generally a younger crowd. Its range of budget accommodation, scattering of simple but decent restaurants, beach bars, and beachside nightclubs gives it something of the mood of a resort in Goa or Bali.

Accommodation

The choice is widespread and value for money largely excellent, but be wary of some special offers that you may see in the package-hotel sector, especially outside peak times. Special offers can either be a bargain or a hint that a hotel is faltering. Check our profiles, decide on your priorities and ask us for advice. We generally recommend the beaches of Bentota (especially the southern end), Induruwa, Kosgoda, Balapitiya and Ahungalle. Wadduwa and Kalutara have several appealing properties for those wanting to be closer to Colombo and the airport. Beruwala, in our view, have been scarred by the 1970’s development of large scale “package resort” hotels, although the Eden Hotel is a sound choice and can offer some splendid special offers.

There are several Geoffrey Bawa designed hotels along the west coast, including Heritance Ahungalla, Lighthouse Hotel in Galle, Blue Waters in Wadduwa, Bentota Beach Hotel and Lunuganga – Bawa’s country retreat and tranquil landscaped gardens – which is open to guests for just four months of the year from December to April. Families travelling with children might like Max Wadiya or Sri Villas in Induruwa; Amaya Reef – a mid-range hotel in Hikkaduwa; or several hotels close to Bentota’s watersports, such as the 5-star Taj Exotica, Bentota Beach Hotel or the simpler Serendib. Among the best budget options are Garden Beach Hotel and Cinnamon Gardens. For those seeking the benefits of Ayurvedic healing and wellness, we recommend the Siddhalepa Ayurveda Holiday Resort in Wadduwa. Lotus Villa in Ahungalla and Paradise Island Health Resort in Bentota takes in guests only for Ayurvedic treatments.

Food & Drink

Hikkaduwa offers most independent dining options, primarily simple beach restaurants, the best of which can offer excellent food – especially fish and curries — at great prices. For good rice and curries try Homegrown. Harbour, Refresh, and Spaghetti & Co also serve international cuisine. For something more casual right on the beach, try Top Secret. The jumbo prawns here are fabulous. The happening night clubs in Hikkaduwa include Vibrations generally on a Friday night and Mambo on Saturdays.

Shopping

Cottage industries such as basket weaving, mask carving, and small shops selling Dutch antiques – furniture, lamps and ornaments, makes for interesting wayside shopping along the west coast especially in Hikkdaduwa and Bentota. The Sri Lankan Handicraft Centre in Bentota also sells traditional crafts. Hikkaduwa is best for bargains in beach, surfing and diving gear.

Events

Elephant Foot Drummers from Hikkaduwa: This family group blends Sri Lanka’s traditional drum beats with a fusion of modern music. Elephant Foot performs at various night clubs in Hikkaduwa. The Elephant Foot Drum Shop located on Galle Road in Hikkaduwa sells traditional local drums as well as their music CDs. Odel and Barefoot bookshop in Colombo also carries their CDs.

Activities

Bawa architecture

bawa 1

 

The west coast is home to many architectural marvels designed by the late Geoffrey Bawa, Sri Lanka most influential architect who was responsible for linking the ancient architecture of this island with that of the modern world. Bawa also had a passion for the island’s varying natural landscapes, which he used as the focal points around which he created. The end result was a cherished architectural style that erased boundaries between the `outside’ and `inside’ of living and working spaces. Heritance Ahungalla, Lighthouse Hotel in Galle and Blue Waters in Wadduwa, designed by Bawa in the 1990s are good examples of his architectural style. Neptune and Bentota Beach Hotel are some of his earlier creations. To gain a better understanding of Bawa’s lifestyle and architecture, we recommend a visit to Lunuganga, Bawa’s country retreat and tranquil gardens, a lifelong project that he continued to develop for almost 50 years.

Richmond Castle, Kalutara

Built in the 19th century for a wealthy regional governor, Don Arthur de Silva, Richmond Castle was designed by a British architect in a blend of Indian and British architecture styles. The mansion is set in extensive landscaped gardens and has now been converted to a Montessori school for underprivileged children. Richmond Castle is located about two km inland near Palathota on the Tudugala road.

Lunuganga

RICHMOND 2

Set on the edge of Lake Dedduwa, Lunuganga is a Renaissance-inspired tropical garden and plantation house, which was the former country residence of Geoffrey Bawa. Lunuganga offers guests a rare opportunity to step inside the private life of the man dubbed “the father of Asian architecture.” The Lunuganga gardens have numerous plants, pavilions, and statues. Its exquisite bedrooms and suites are offered to guest for just four months of the year from December to April. For the rest of the year it is handed back to the Bawa Trust and is used as an artist’s retreat.

Brief Gardens

brief 4

Brief Gardens, 10 kms inland from Bentota beach, is the rural retreat of Bevis Bawa, the older brother of architect Geoffrey Bawa. These extensive gardens are both beautiful and steeped in history. Well worth a visit.
Traditional masks in Ambalangoda

The traditional masks are very much a part of Sri Lanka’s culture and folklore. Kolam masks are used for dramatic purposes to enact traditional folktales and history; Thovil masks are used for exorcism rituals especially to eradicate disease. Each mask has a specific purpose. Mask crafting is an intricate skill that is passed down in generations.

Traditional Ruhunu dance

traditional masks 5

Traditional dance forms in Sri Lanka date back to the 4th century B.C. and are associated with rituals and ceremonies performed to expel sickness and misfortune and to evoke blessings. Several classical dance forms evolved in different regions. Presently, three main dance forms are performed: Kandyan (upcountry – Kandyan), Sabaragamuwa (central province), and Ruhunu (low country – southern). Each of these styles differs in dress, rhythm of the drums, dance movements, and songs, which are based on folklore relevant to the particular region. Masked dancers depicting numerous forms of birds, reptiles and demons dance to the rhythms of drums. Chanting, miming and dialogue may enact traditional folklore.

Traditional dance performances

traditional 6

Bandu Wijesuria’s Dance School located in Ambalangoda next door to the Ariyapala Mask Meuseum arranges for traditional Kandyan and southern dance performances.

Ariyapala Mask Museum

7

This museum in Ambalangoda exhibits traditional Kolam and Thovil masks some of which are rare and date back centuries.

 

 

Gangatilaka Vihara in Kalutara

8

Located just past the bridge in Kalutara, this Buddhist temple built in the 1960s is easily accessed as it is situated just by the roadside. The gigantic white Dagoba is believed to contain sacred relics of the Buddha. Murals depict the life story of Buddha.

 

Galapatha Temple in Aluthgama

9

This ancient temple houses temple paintings, sculptures, and an impressive reclining Buddha statue. The temple lies about five kms from Beruwela.

 

Galagoda Temple

Situated in Karandeniya, about five km inland in Ambalangoda. Houses a 50m-long reclining Buddha considered to be the longest in Sri Lanka.

Water sports in Bentota

 

12

Take a short boat trip offshore to dive over the coral reefs, grab a snorkel and mask to paddle your way through tropical fish, or take advantage of the lively breezes on the west coast from December to March to windsurf. If speed is more your thing then there are jetski and waterski companies on the lagoon.

 

Canoe trip on the Kalu Ganga

13

The Kalu Ganga begins its journey to the sea on the western slopes of Adams Peak, Sri Lanka’s holy mountain. The divine waters flow slowly west, its banks lined with jungle, rubber plantations and communities using the river in their daily lives. Exploring the backwaters by canoe – a haven for birdlife, with both Black and Cinnamon Bitterns often seen scrambling for cover as you paddle through the mangroves — is magical.

Deep sea fishing

14

Sri Lanka’s seas hold a relative abundance of game fish. Species of Marlin, Sail Fish, Wahoo, Spanish mackerel, Giant Trevallie, Benito, Queen Fish (the world record is held in Sri Lanka), Barracuda, Grouper, Cobia and Tuna make this tropical paradise superb deep sea fishing territory. Deep sea angling is the most popular form of recreational and sport fishing in Sri Lanka. There are a wide variety of locations off the west coast resorts.

 

Surfing in Hikkaduwa

15

The best surfing spots in Hikkaduwa are in Wewala. Narigama is good for body surfing. Surf boards, gear, and even clothing can be sourced from Hikkaduwa.

 

Siddhalepa Health Resort

16

The Siddhalepa Health Resort has an Ayurveda tradition that dates back 200 years. Daily Yoga and weekly Meditation classes are held as a complement to the preventive and curative Ayurveda treatments on offer.

 

Paradise Island Health Resort

17

Situated on a the spit between the river and the sea in the west coast town of Bentota, Paradise Island is a peaceful setting where the ancient healing wisdom of Ayurveda is practiced to create holistic wellness. Medicinal herbs are sourced from near by villages and the oils, medicines, tonics and pastes are all prepared in-house for each guest based on individual requirements. Complementary activities such as Yoga, meditation, and acupuncture are also conducted on a regular basis. The Paradise Island Health Resort is strictly for Ayurveda clients only.

Spa Pavillions at Blue Waters

18

Blue Water is conveniently situated close to Colombo on the West coast. Its main theme is the ambitious use of water, which gives the hotel its name. The Spa Pavilions at Blue Waters takes a holistic approach to physical and spiritual well being.

 

Meetiyagoda’s Moonstones

19

The semi-precious gemstone known as `moonstone’ which has a milky bluish glow similar to that of the moon, is found only in the village of Meetiyagoda. It is said that the moonstone enhances the good fortune of the wearer and is also the birth stone for the month of June. Moonstones are especially popular with younger people as it is mainly set into silver jewellery. Located inland from Ambalangoda, the tiny Meetiyagoda moonstone mine is spread over roughly an acre. The stones are still mined using traditional methods with the mine shaft going down as deep as 50 feet. Cutting and polishing of the gemstone can be observed here. Jewellery is also available for purchase.

The Coconut Palm

Considered to be a life nurturing tree, the coconut palm is often presented as a precious gift. Every part of this precious tree is used in daily life. The leaves (gokkala) are woven into decorations at weddings or other ceremonies; the golden king coconut fruit (thambili) is known to have medicinal value; the coconut milk and oil is a basic ingredient in the local rice and curries; the coconut shell is turned into ornate cooking utensils including serving spoons; the outer husk of the coconut is soaked and processed into coir out of which hand spun rope, doormats and brushes are produced; and finally the bark of the tree is used to build outrigger canoes and fishing boats, and is also used in construction of houses and furniture.

Personal Yoga instruction

21

A growing number of guesthouses, hotels and retreats offer Yoga. However, some of our clients prefer private tuition and Red Dot is happy to organize this subject to availability of teachers. The easiest area to do this is around Galle but private yoga teachers can also be employed in Bentota and Tangalle. Red Dot does not charge for this service and you would need to pay your Yoga teacher direct.

Dodanduwa’s island bird life

22

Situated off Hikkaduwa, this serene island hermitage, rich in birdlife, can be visited only with prior permission.

 

Marine Turtle Conservation in Kosgoda

23

Globally, all seven species of marine turtles are endangered. Of these seven, five come ashore to nest in Sri Lanka. The process of marine turtles nesting, hatchlings being born, and swimming back to sea is fascinating to observe. The Kosgoda Conservation Project is an ideal way to learn and observe this endangered species. Garden Beach Hotel, on the edge of Turtle Beach, offers responsible night-time expeditions to its guests if turtles are laying.

Sinharaja

24

Moist and muggy, murky and mysterious – an experience of Sinharaja is like nothing else in Sri Lanka. Trekking through the last surviving stretch of virgin rainforest on the island, be ready to pour with sweat as you walk though a bewildering land of exotic colours and wonderful sounds. The forest teems with life whether it be gushing waterfalls, gurgling streams, ants marching, leaves rustling, leeches waiting (you’ve been warned!), crickets creaking or butterflies fluttering.

 

We do have packages for Sri Lanka, write us on adler-tours@hotmail.com or visit our site http://www.adler-tours.com

Some MAGICAL KENYAN Delights !!!


One Very Royal Kenya

kenya

Kenya is proud to be part of the British monarchy’s history, with Queen Elizabeth learning

of her succession to the throne whilst in Aberdare National Park in 1952 and Prince William proposing to Kate on the foothills of Mount Kenya whilst on holiday in 2010.

With opulent accommodation options and Kenya’s longstanding history with the royal family, the country looks forward to one day welcoming the future King George to the destination that is so special to his parents with its stunning landscapes, fascinating culture and spectacular wildlife.

The Princess who arrived in Kenya, and left as a Queen

kenya1Kenya is proud of its longstanding relationship with the royal family and the country became part of history when in February 1952 a 25-year old Princess Elizabeth was in Kenya when she received news of her father’s death and learnt of her succession to the throne. The young Princess was staying at Treetops Lodge in the Aberdare National Park when she learnt that she was to become Queen. This was just the beginning of a very special royal connection between Kenya and the royal family.

The Aberdares is the third highest range of mountains in Kenya, well known for its thick forests and spectacular waterfalls. The forest is rich in game and large herds of buffalo. Rare species include giant forest hog, Bongo antelope and Colobus monkeys. Night time here is truly spectacular with elephant herds surrounding the waterholes, drinking and then fading away back into the forest.

The Prince who proposed the future Duchess of Cambridge

kenya2In October 2010, at a beautiful lake-side spot in the Lewa Conservancy on the slopes of Mount Kenya Prince William proposed to Kate Middleton, continuing the royal connection with Kenya. The bride and groom also included a ‘Save the Black Rhino in Kenya’ project among the charities on their wedding gift list. In celebration of the royal engagement, the Kenya Tourism Board handed out 13,000 hand-picked roses from Flamingo Farm in Lake Naivasha to London commuters.

Mount Kenya is Africa’s second highest peak standing at 5,199 metres. The forests around the base of Mount Kenya are rich in game, particularly buffalo and elephants. The area is also known for sightings of black panthers. It is possible to climb slopes of Mount Kenya with some assistance and a trek to the summit can take between 3 and 5 days. Home to the world famous Safaricom Marathon, the Lewa conservancy, north-west of Mount Kenya is the perfect location to spot black rhino with outstanding game viewing.

Lake Naivasha is a beautiful freshwater lake, fringed by thick papyrus, only a short drive from Nairobi. Parts of the shore-line have recorded more than 400 bird species and the Acacia forest teems with birdlife. Lake Naivasha is also famed for its hippo population. The lake and its surrounds are rich in natural bounty, and the fertile soils and water supply have made this one of Kenya’s prime agricultural regions.

ACTIVE BALI


active bali

Forget Eat Pray Love, this Indonesian getaway is real appeal lies in its action adventure offerings.

Its lush green rice paddies, pretty white sand beaches, plethora of spas and retreats and frequent colourful festivals make Bali the obvious choice for a relaxing getaway. But not all of us love spending ten days sprawled out on a beach towel soaking up rays. Thankfully, the island’s incredible landscape makes it ideal for numerous activities to inject a little excitement into your trip, too.  Despite its tiny size, each area of the island is quite distinctive, so it’s worth hopping around every few days to experience the best Bali has to offer.

Ubud is perhaps the best known spot, due to its starring role in the ‘Love’ section of Elizabeth Gilbert’s  book (and subsequent film) Eat Pray Love, and the town certainly has a lot  to offer those looking for the same spiritual awakening (some may say midlife crisis) she experienced. The activities available are somewhat serene and, as such, draw those attracted to its slow pace, vegan cafés and the possibility of meeting their very own hunky Javier Bardem.

If you spend any time in the town’s cafés munching on raw cakes and spirulina and berry smoothies (and you absolutely should), you can’t fail to notice leaflets and posters promoting Yoga Barn. The studio offers the usual power yoga and Iyengar to help you destress and lengthen those limbs as well as some more, ahem, unusual activities such as ecstatic dance (dancing like a loony), crystal bowl meditation and sound healing. It’s easy to get swept up in this way of life in a town that wafts with the smell of incense from every temple and seems to encourage clean living and a slower lifestyle with its café culture and pretty surrounds.

To complement your yoga, most of  the town’s guesthouses rent out cheap  bicycles which can be used to explore  the jaw-droppingly beautiful (and  sometimes surprisingly steep) lanes  and roads that wind through the temples and the green rice paddies which  are stacked up on hillsides surrounding  the village. Make sure you remember to pack a camera and plenty of water!

But if Ubud is a little too laid-back to satisfy the adrenaline junkie in you, Kuta is the best spot for some of Bali’s best known activities. People flock to Kuta for its long beaches and great surf.  Whether you’re a beginner or you could  show the Balinese beach boys a thing  or two, the whole town is set up to ensure you have access to everything you need to hit the waves and show off your skills. Unfortunately, that comes at a price. The town is far from beautiful, except the beach, which remains relatively unspoilt. It is no doubt the ugliest part of Bali, and is lined with western style pubs and restaurants and was the site of the tragic Bali bombing in 2002. By day, everyone hits the beach for surf school and to show off their toned abs while at night the town comes alive with thumping music pumping out of a whole street full of clubs.

sanur beachBut to base yourself in Kuta would mean missing out on some of Bali’s most dramatic and beautiful sights so ensure that, if you want to surf, you also allow time to pack up your belongings and stay in a hotel elsewhere for at least a few nights. It is also worth nothing that Kuta is not the be all and end all of water sports on the island. While it is the best spot for surfing and kite surfing thanks to its impressive waves, stand up paddle boarding can be done almost anywhere. Schools tend to be based around the Sanur area which is free from surfers and allows beginners to learn on flat waters before progressing to catching waves on their very first lesson.

If you’d rather keep your feet on dry land, one of the best ways to take in Bali’s coast, temples, mountains and rice paddies is to take an organised bike trip through the very best the island has to offer. There are a clutch of companies offering tours ranging from simple loops around Ubud (which are easy enough to navigate alone) or more advanced trips, such as the popular Mt

lake batur

Batur Crater Rim to Batur Lake route, which involves a hair-raising descent from 1,700m above sea level with the sea on one side and the crater on the other for a lengthy 35.9km. There are a mind-boggling number of companies offering guided tours of most parts of the island, ranging from easy loops of Ubud to challenging mountain descents.

If you’re not very confident on two wheels, you can also scale the island’s volcanoes by foot. In fact, hiking in Bali is big business and there are a number of hikes you can arrange with a guide or for smaller trips, set off on alone. One of the most popular is the sunrise hike to Bali’s tallest mountain, Gunung Agung, which involves a mostly dark trek up the mountain, rewarded with a spectacular sunrise when you reach the top. Many people consider this one of Bali’s most rewarding experiences. There are also numerous hikes through paddy fields, thick forest and waterfalls and hidden temples. If you decide to  hike, do your research in advance to  find out if a guide is needed (sometimes  scammers will tell you a guide is necessary when it isn’t, but in other spots an experienced guide is essential), find out  what you should wear for the journey  and if there are any permits you need  for the walk. A good concierge or tourist information centre will be able to discuss this with you.

A trip to Bali isn’t complete without a little diving or snorkelling. Nearby islands of Lombok and the Gili’s are great for exploring the ocean, but you can find plenty of spots on Bali that are teeming with marine life too. The most popular spot for snorkelers and divers alike on the island is Pulau Menjangan, where you’ll find a reef alive with parrotfish, clownfish

snorkeller

and corals as well as exciting caves and drops in which to explore the local flora and fauna. Tulamben is another option, offering a sunken freighter just metres from the shore, making it perfect for easy snorkelling. Ten days is a good amount of time to spend hopping around the island by taxi or bus and take in its best activities and sights. Travel from one side of the island to the other can take just a few hours if you go directly (significantly more if you take a bus).

The best news is that however active you are, you can rejuvenate your aching body for pocket change. In Bali, you are never far from a great Balinese massage, the island’s traditional and well known techniques of acupressure, skin rolling, and stroking using essential oils to stimulate the lymphatic system. Those who are really interested in the technique can take a short course to master the massage – which is both a brilliantly selfish present and the best souvenir you can take back to friends and family! Everyone is a winner.

Courtesy by K.T.

Bhutan – Land of the Thunder Dragon


MUST DO ACTIVITIES In BHUTAN

Orchid Trek

The Orchid Trek Route is inside the Bumdelling Wildlife Sanctuary which is located in the North-east of Bhutan in the Eastern Himalayas. It

is approximately 28 kilometer long connecting Rigsum gompa, Peri Gompa and Dechenphdrang. The best time to trek would be during spring, autumn and winter.

The reason for developing such trail is, it not only connects the two historical and cultural sites, Risum Goenpa and Dechen Phodrang but it serves as access route to other villages for transportation of agricultural and livestock products to the market. Annually more than thousand of devotees from all across the country visit these   two cultural sites. Apart from the cultural aspects,

the route also provides wide range of opportunities for the birders, nature lovers’ tourists and plant enthusiast groups.

 

Bumdelling Wildlife Sanctuary

Bumdelling Wildlife Sanctuary is located in north-eastern part of Bhutan covering an area of 1,545 sq. km with 420 sq. km of buffer zone encompassing parts of Trashi Yangtse, Lhuntshe, and Monggar district.

Bumdelling Wildlife Sanctuary is also a paradise for butterflies: as of now 130 species have been recorded and another 120 are expected to inhabit this area. The very rare Ludlow’s Bhutan Swallowtail is found here. The sanctuary is home to around 100 species of mammals, including globally endangered species such as snow leopard, Royal Bengal tiger and red panda.

 

Trek to Bumdelling Wildlife Sanctuary

Bumdelling Wildlife Sanctuary is located in the Northeastern part of Bhutan in the Eastern Himalayas. Bumdelling Wildlife Sanctuary also has numerous historical and cultural sites.

The sanctuary is home to around 100 species of mammals and 296 species of birds. There are certain charismatic, keystone and globally endangered species of mammals in Bumdelling Wildlife Sanctuary such as Snow leopard, Bengal tiger, and Red panda, and Capped Langur (Common). The sanctuary has a rich floristic diversity comprising   650 species   of   vascular   plants
including the totally protected species of Bhutan such as the blue poppy (Bhutan’s national flower), Himalayan yew and Chinese caterpillar.

 

DID YOU KNOW? (About BHUTAN)

Trashi Yangtse is known for the excellent wooden cups and bowls made here from avocado and maple wood using water-driven and treadle lathes. It is also a centre of paper making. They use the tsasho technique with a bamboo frame, which produces a distinctive pattern on the paper.
Mask Dances are an integral part of Bhutanese culture. There are hundreds of different dances each with their own special meanings and stories. Many date   back hundreds   of
years and visitors can view these spectacular dances at annual Tshechus (Annual Religious Festivals) that take place throughout the country.
Traditional Bhutanese eating habits are simple and in general, food is eaten with hands. Family members eat while sitting cross legged on the wooden floor with food first being served to the head of the household first.

 

Visit us at, www.adler-tours.com

Top 25 Photographs from the Wilderness #7

Birding in Bhutan


Bhutan is enormously rich in bird diversity. Of the 675 species recorded, 78% are resident and breeding, 7% are passage migrant, 8% are winter visitor, 6% are uncertain and 1% fall in the data deficient category; 27% show elevational migrations.

BirdWatching

 Bhutan has two critically endangered (white-bellied heron Ardea insignis is white rumped vulture), one endangered, 12 vulnerable (black-necked crane Grus nigricollis, rufous-necked hornbill Aceros nipalensis, chestnut-breasted partridge Arborophila mandellii, Pallas’s fish eagle Haliaeetus leucoryphus, beautiful nuthatch Sitta Formosa, wood snipe Gallinago nemoricola, Blyth’s tragopan Tragopan blythii, greater spotted eagle Aquila clanga, Imperial eagle Aquila heliaca, Baer’s pochard Aythya baeri, Hodgson’s bushcat Saxicola insignis, dark-rumped swift Apus acuticauda, and grey-crowned prinia Prinia cinereocapilla), 11 near-threatened, and 11 restricted range bird species (Blyth’s tragopan Tragopan blythii, chestnut-breasted partridge Arborophila mandellii, dark-rumped swift Apus acuticauda, ward’s trogon Harpactes wardi, rufous-throated wren babbler Spelaeornis caudatus, hoary-throated barwing Actinodura nipalensis, brown-throated fulvetta Alcippe ludlowi, white-naped yuhina Yuhina bakeri, yellow-vented warbler Phylloscopus cantator, and broad-billed warbler Tickellia hodgsoni) as per IUCN 2003.

On a global scale, the country is recognized as forming a part of several globally important bird regions. It is a part of the Sino-Himalayan mountain forests, Indo-Burmese forests, Indo-Gangetic grasslands, South Asian arid habitats, and Tibetan plateau wetlands – all categorized as globally important bird regions by BirdLife International.’

For Birding Trips Contact:- 00-91-281-246523

Vancouver’s must See !!



8 Must See Attractions & Neighborhoods

  • Grouse Mountain
  • Capilano Suspension Bridge Park
  • GranVille Island
  • Vancouver Aquarium
  • Stanley Park
  • Gastown
  • Robson Street
  • Yale Town


6 Must See Festivals & Events

5 Must Stay Hotels

  • Fairmont Pacific Rim

Fairmont Hotel Vancouver

  • Fairmont Water Front
  • Four Seasons
  • Pan Pacific Vancouver

6 Must Dine Restaurant

1 Must do Itinery
Explore Vancouver
Day 1

Explore the sights of Vancouver. Take a hop on, off sightseeing tour starting at the 1,000 acre Stanley Park and a visit to Vancouver Aquarium, Totem Park and Prospect Point. Next visit Gastown, a charming neighborhood home to a number of shops and galleries, restaurants and coffee shops. Visitors can stroll along the cobblestone streets while enjoying a refreshing beverage in this historic neighborhood. Next visit ancient Chinatown outside of the park travel along the beaches of scenic English Bay, make your way across Burrard Street Bridge to Granville Island where you can enjoy a casual meal while taking in some street-side entertainment before touring the public market and the island’s famed artisan studios. Then take a return trip across False Creek back to downtown abroad a quaint False Creek Ferry to Yaletown, one of the Vancouver’s most vibrant and hippest neighborhoods.

Day 2

Visit Vancouver’s North Shore Mountains and explore the city’s great outdoors. the Capilano Suspension Bridge is located in the heart of the Vancouver’s Temperate Rainforest. Take a stroll along Treetops Adventure, and their newest attraction, cliff-walk before taking in native carving demonstrations. Next stop is Grouse Mountains– The Peak Of Vancouver, located a short distance up the road from the Capilano Suspension Bridge. Take the sky-ride to the top of the mountain, providing sensational views of the city far below. At the top, visit the Refuge for endangered wildlife featuring two orphaned grizzly bears, Birds in Motion demonstration, Lumber Jack show or take a ride up the eye of the Wind Viewpoint located 20 stories high. Zip-lining, tandem-paragliding and helicopter tours are also available.

« Older entries

%d bloggers like this: